Transit Funding Tops List of Legislative Priorities in 2018

By on January 4, 2018

From Citizens for Modern Transit:  Transit funding, regional transit priorities and development top the list of CMT’s legislative priorities for FY18.  Citizens for Modern Transit recently released its FY18 Legislative Priorities. The economic future of the State of Missouri is tied directly to our commitment to funding of the State’s infrastructure.

Investment in public transit throughout Missouri delivers proven economic results, and promotes private development and reinvestment in both rural and urban under-resourced communities. Community leaders across the State have identified public transit priorities that will increase service and yield significant positive economic returns. These plans will improve access to opportunity, attract talent, and create thousands of jobs .  CMT will be advocating for local, state and federal policies and funding for operating and capital for transit to provide an opportunity for these plans to come to fruition. In addition, safety and security continue to top the list of local priorities for the organization.

FEDERAL INVESTMENT
CMT supported the passage of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act which was passed into law in December 2015. This was the first long-term federal transportation bill since 2005. There were no cuts to overall funding levels from the prior bill, MAP-21. The current bill authorizes $230 billion for highways, $61 billion for public transportation, $10 billion for passenger rail and $5 billion for highway safety programs. However, the funds available under the Bus Capital and No-Lo Emission programs are significantly lower than the needs demonstrate. In addition, the future of federal funding is uncertain under the new Administration. While advocates continue to push for federal funding for capital and operating, programs like TIGER and New Starts are possibly on the chopping block. MO needs its own plan for raising additional transportation revenue, both to control its own infrastructure needs and to show its ability to provide state matching dollars to attract any federal funding available.

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